Tag Archive | Virginia

Happy Saint Patty’s Day!

nice-irish-sayings-image

“St. Patrick’s Day was basically invented in America by Irish-Americans,” classics professor Philip Freeman of Luther College in Iowa told National Geographic.

On March 17, 1762, Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. As Irish patriotism grew among American immigrants, the annual holiday began to grow in popularity with different “Irish Aid” societies holding annual parades. In 1962, as immigrants began to spread throughout the United States, a new annual St Patrick’s Day tradition was born in Chicago. In 1962, city pollution workers dyed the Chicago River green to commemorate the holiday.

Today, St. Patrick’s Day has become an international celebration. Beginning in 1995, the Irish government made March 17 a national holiday in an effort to boost tourism. Today, approximately 1 million people attend the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Dublin. (source)

But on this day, March 17, 2014, in honor of my DAUGHERTY AND DAVIDSON ancestors, I celebrate!

O'Doherty

We have exciting news!  … from a researcher I had been in contact with and we have now established our ancestor’s identity in Ireland!  The parents of James, William, John and Nancy! (Dougherty/Daugherty) Such a find -… There are several sources to be confirmed, …now we have some tangible information to follow up on, We are putting a list of researchers together for the O’Dochartaigh Clann Newsletter to publish contacts for other researchers to network with us that can further extend or ancestry and descendants.  We are now designated as Family Group #2264 in the Clann Database…. I was given our ancestry back 32 generations to 810 – Maengal, father of Ua Chart, the Patriarch of all O’Dochartaigh’s (source – Robert Bobby Scott)

My Appalachian Cousin Cracked Chestnuts with His Bare Heels

Jess and Leanna Kiser on the porch of their Sandy Ridge home (Russell County, Virginia). Jess was known for cracking chestnuts with his bare heels. The young girl may be their granddaughter Effie and the man may be their son-in-law Paris Kiser. (photo courtesy of Harold James Breeding and published in WILDER DAYS).KISER Jesse Sutherland Kiser family s-o of James S. Bell Clapper a

Two pioneer families settled along the Clinch River in Russell County, Virginia. The Kiser’s and Sutherland’s, (Germans – Scots).  According to author and historian Kathy Shearer in her book WILDER DAYS-Coal Town Life on Dumps Creek, (pages 86-87) “Uncle Jess Kiser, would come down from Sandy Ridge to peddle in Wilder. Jess’s sister was Surredly Kiser Sutherland, wife of Elihu Sutherland. (recounted by his niece Kate Parrot) Uncle Jess Kiser, he entertained everybody at the company store. He never put shoes on his feet: he tied sacks around them in the winter; He always danced at the store. He’s witty and they liked him. He was tough and snow didn’t bother him or anything. He would bring us apples and say, Apples if you want’em, apples if you don’t want’em. Mother would say, Jess, what you want this morning? She would fix him some cornbread.”

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=48415639

MORE KISER/KEYSER… Source: Materials posted by Mark R. Kiser (MRKiser@aol.com), 23 Mar 1998. Kiser, Joseph, 1756-1816 Joseph Kiser was born about the year 1756 probably in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. His father, Charles Keyser from Germany, had settled in Lancaster County (1) for a period of time before he acquired land in Frederick County, Virginia in 1765 (2) and area near Hawksbill, later to become Shenandoah County and presently located in Page County, Virginia. On October 8, 1778 he appears in the Page County records when he sued for debt and was awarded 18 shillings and 6 pence plus court cost. On October 10, 1782 the Commonwealth of Virginia granted Joeph Keyser 88 acres of land on the south side of the Clinch River. Marginal notations show this entry marked “void” and “Survd. 50 acres”. The same record shows that on December 18, 1783 he had surveyed 50 acres at the same location. At that time the land was in Washington County, later to become a part of Russell County in 1786. The area he settled became known as Keyser Station, today known as Carbo. In December of 1785 he signed the petition to form Russell County. On March 18, 1793 he purchased 70 acres of land on Becks Branch of Russell County from John Frost and others. On November 24, 1801, Joseph and his wife, Susannah, conveyed to Jacob Burch 50 acres of land on the waters of Clinch River on the north side of Copper Ridge and adjoining Edward Kelly, “it being fifty acres which land was granted by the Commonwealth to said Keiser bearing date the 21st day of November 1792”. Both grantors signed the deed. He was a Russell County juror on April 22, 1789, and also on June 26, 1792. He was allowed 12 shillings, 6 pence for killing one old wolf on February 22, 1791. His estate was appraised by Abraham Childress, James Sutherland, Jacob Blare and William Kelley, and the appraisal was recorded February 6, 1816. Joseph married Susannah Stacey probably in Page County, Virginia but spent most of their lives in Russell County, Virginia where both died, Joseph in 1816. Nearly all his descendants spell their surname Kiser. … (1) Kercheval’s “History of the Valley”, 4th Ed., page 37 relates an incident in relation to which “Major Andrew Keyser also informed the author that an Indian once called at his father’s in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, appeared to be much agitated, and asked for something to eat. After refreshing himself he was asked what disturbed him. He replied, ‘The Southern Indians have killed my whole nation.'” This indicates clearly that Charles Keyser lived in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, before he settled in what is now Page County, Virginia. (2) By deed of April 6, 1765, recorded in Frederick County, Virginia, deed book No. 10, page 248, Lewis Rhinehart and Mathias Rhinehart of Frederick County, Virginia conveyed unto Charles Keyser, of the same place, a parcel of land on the South Fork of the Shenandoah, being the lower end of two tracts of land granted to Mathias Rhinehart by deed of February 8, 1764, from the Proprietor’s Office of the Northern Neck of Virginia. NOTE: I have located in a book titled, “Bird-Samuels Paper” that a Joseph Kiser, along with Charles Kiser (Jr.) are listed in Michael Reader’s Company of Dunmore County, Virginia during the Revolutionary War. Dunmore County eventually became Shenadoah County. I believe this Joseph Kiser to be the same Joseph that settled in Russell County, Virginia and he also had a brother named Charles Kiser (Jr.). I have written to the National Archives to obtain records but that were unable to locate any.
Source: Julie Voyles (JVoyles105@aol.com) posted on the Russell Co. List Server information regarding the descendants of Karl Keyser, some of which contradicts information in the above. “Joseph Keyser/Kiser (1756-1818) married Susannah Stacy and they migrated to Washington, Co., VA which became Russell Co. They lived in the same place on the same patch of land all their lives. They are the progenators of our line there in Russell County. Most all their descendants spell their name Kiser.”
More About Joseph Kenton Keyser: Burial: Unknown, Carbo Community Church Cemetery, Carbo, Russell Co., Virginia.
More About Joseph Kenton Keyser and Susannah Stacy: Marriage: 1757, Lancaster Co., Pa.
Children of Joseph Kenton Keyser and Susannah Stacy are:

  1. +Mary “Polly” Kiser, b. 1794, Russell Co, VA, d. date unknown.
  2. +John C. Kiser, b. August 08, 1786, Russell Co, VA, d. April 15, 1852, Russell Co, VA.
  3. Joseph Kenton Kiser Jr, b. June 06, 1782, d. date unknown.
  4. Abednego Kiser, b. 1784, d. date unknown.
  5. Nimrod Kiser, b. 1788, d. date unknown.
  6. Ephriam Noah Kiser, b. 1790, d. date unknown.
  7. Susanna Kiser, b. 1792, d. date unknown.
  8. Charles Kiser, b. 1796, d. date unknown.
  9. Elizabeth Kiser, b. 1798, d. date unknown.

Children of Joseph Kenton Keyser and Susannah Stacy are:

  1. +John C. Kiser, b. August 08, 1786, Russell Co, VA, d. April 15, 1852, Russell Co, VA.
  2. Joseph Kenton Kiser Jr, b. June 06, 1782, d. date unknown.
  3. Abednego Kiser, b. 1784, d. date unknown.
  4. Nimrod Kiser, b. 1788, d. date unknown.
  5. Ephriam Noah Kiser, b. 1790, d. date unknown.
  6. Susanna Kiser, b. 1792, d. date unknown.
  7. Charles Kiser, b. 1796, d. date unknown.
  8. Elizabeth Kiser, b. 1798, d. date unknown.
  9. +Mary “Polly” Kiser, b. 1794, Russell Co, VA, d. date unknown.

MORE SUTHERLAND Source:

     Most persons can be identified with one characteristic of special interest. Elihu Jasper Sutherland seemed to have been curious about everything under the sun and developed many talents. From his first known Scotch ancestor, James Sutherland, he inherited the trait of thrift and tenaciousness. From his Germanic grandfather’s great grandfather, John Counts (of Glade Hollow) came the tendency to scholarship and accuracy. From his grandmother’s grandmother, red-haired Irish Peggy Kelly, came his poetic flair. In the veins of his ancestors also came English blood. From all his many ancestors, “EJ” received a rich heritage.            I shall review some of the outstanding interests of Elihu Jasper Sutherland and shall often illustrate by quotations.            He valued schools. He was a teacher, County School Board Chairman, and counsellor. IN November, 1938, he wrote:            “And books – being a younger child. I got the old books as my brother finished with them. I dug ‘sang’ to get my first new books. You can be sure they were precious to me.”            “The coming of visitors – the school superintendent riding a prancing horse, trustees often coming on foot, and patrons of the school smiling on all the scholars and bragging on the teacher. Sometimes they gave us short talks about the value of schools – the benefits of being good – making good citizens – their humble advice still helps us over rough spots in the road of life – Do your teachers take time to teach you the Golden Rule and ‘memory gems?’ – to warn you of the dangers of strong drink and bad company? The old teachers taught much along these lines – their labors bore choice fruits.” (1)            He was a student of politics. In 1901, “EJ” was sent for three months to Stratton School, twelve miles from home, where his cousin Thurman L. Sutherland was his teacher. In his “School Recollections,” (December 12, 1937), he wrote:            “I learned very well from my books, and my outlook on the world was considerably widened by being farther from home and meeting people from other sections. Reading the newspapers and hearing men talk about legal and political questions awakened my interest in these matters.”            Writing on party politics later in life, “EJ” gave his opinions and commented, “I have been a Young Democrat a long time – I couldn’t be anything else.” (2)            He was a Genealogist. He was a member of the National Genealogical Society. His studies of the Counts and related families are recorded in more than fifty loose-leaf notebooks of original data. He traveled to many courthouses to copy exact records, interviewed relatives or neighbors and secured Bible or other written records about persons.             I recall his skill in getting facts from an Incident in 1944 when we were trying to find the Bedford County home of our common grandfather’s grandfather, “Jamie the Scotchman” Sutherland. He had first gotten from the country court records the chain of title of the land our ancestor owned, and it was clear that it was known as the “Alexander Gray Place.” When we approached the location, we asked a man pruning a tree for information. He said he had never heard of James Sutherland, and this was to be expected since “Jamie” sold the land in 1799. He also said he had never heard of Alexander Gray. Then “EJ’s” skill in interviewing came to the rescue. He suggested Alexander might have been called “Alex”. Then the light dawned, “Oh,” said the man who did not know Alexander Gray, “I married Alex Gray’s granddaughter.” Now we were given exact information as to how to go and, with others helping and commenting, we were directed to “two large walnuts near a pile of stones and debris,” near an old graveyard. This was the place where James Sutherland had lived some twenty years before moving to Catawba Creek and later to Carbo on the Clinch River in Russell County, Virginia. (3)             He kept accurate records. During his lifetime he collected fifteen picture albums and approximately 125 scrapbooks. Fifty-five of the latter contain Dr. Goodridge Wilson’s “The Southwest Corner,” complete from the first entry (3-31-29) to the present, which Hetty has kept up the past five years. His collection of more than a hundred loose-leaf notebooks (typed pages) include the proceedings of each Counts Reunion from the first in 1936 through 1969; “Recollections” of oldest citizens dating back to the Civil War; Family Bible Records, Church Records, County Court House Records of Virginia, Kentucky and North Carolina; Tombstone Inscriptions; Genealogy; Folk Lore; “Heard on Frying Pan,” Old Letters, A Bibliography of Southwest Virginia, copies of diaries (his own and some others); and his own writings including speeches, accounts of tours and hikes, and “Seen from Sunset Hill.”             His diaries began in January, 1904, and I quote from his next to the last entry at Johnston Memorial Hospital on July 3, 1964.            “Woke up early. Pretty good night. Breakfast: milk, toast, orange juice, 2 eggs, oatmeal. Dr. Barrow visited. Usual injections. Billy came by and stayed awhile, then went to Emory for Toy. Dinner: milk, potato, fish, tomatoes. Billy and Toy came in awhile; Maxie Mullins and Elsie, Ralph Selfe, Tim Fleming. Supper: milk, liver, lettuce, mashed potatoes, slice watermelon. Robert Lee Barrett placed in my room. Light rain in P. M. Late visitors: Gabe and Tim, Hoge and May.            He was a close observer of events and their meaning. In 1941, he edited his old column in The Dickenson Forum entitled, “Seen from Sunset Hill,” with comments on books, seasons of the year, courts, county fair, family reunions, boyhood memories, deaths of older citizens, schools, politics, etc. See “EJ’s” mind in motion as he describes “Payday t the Mines” in 1938:            “A drizzly Saturday did not dampen the ardor of the crowds that slopped through the narrow streets, gathered on porches and under the sparing shelter of sickly trees, crowded the commissary, restaurant, postoffice and drug store. All were happy, even boisterous. Cars were parked along the street as far as the eye could see, or honked and twisted and squeezed slowly through the choked thoroughfare – part and parcel of this moving drama of the coal-abounding hills – payday for the sweat and toil of two weeks underground.”            “By twelve o’clock lines began to form at the pay windows, little men, big men, old men, young men, women, children fell into line.”             “One-thirty – the pay windows opened – the miners or members of their families began filing past. Each signed a slip of paper, and an envelope was thrust out. The recipients stepped aside, carefully opened the packet, counted the contents, smiled a little, and wandered off.”            “A crippled beggar sat hunched at the head of the steps, hand outstretched. Another beggar, blind, holding a battered banjo in one hand and a tin cup in the other. Still another blind supplicant strummed a guitar and helped his timid, sad-eyed daughter sing snatches of a plaintive song – it was payday for the beggars too.”            “Beggars were not the only ones who held out hands to these toilers – local merchants, car dealers, garage owners, lawyers, collecting officers, tax collectors, etc., waiting for the man with the pay envelope. Quietly and in great good humor, creditors met debtors, exchanged friendly greetings and some crisp bills for scrawled receipts, and passed on – laughter was predominant – there was no disorder.”            “In two hours over thirty thousand dollars had trickled out of the company’s till into the hands of miners – this money would go into every corner of the county – thirty thousand dollars each two weeks – sixty thousand dollars each month – three quarters of a million in one year! If this steady stream of cash should suddenly dry up, what would the people do? I wonder – ” (4)            He loved farm life. At their Sunset Hill home in Clintwood, “EJ” and Hetty had their own garden and, until the sons went to college, kept a cow and chickens. Hear him recall his boyhood experiences in the Lower Field of his old Frying Pan farm home:            “The old rail fence has rotted down; the hillsides and flats are covered with a tangle of briers and young trees. Gone are the corn rows, the wheat shocks, and the timothy cocks. But the old, well-beaten footpath from the Middle Bars to the Lower Barn still leads across the center of the Lower Field. Also, one can see, hidden in the full-leaved bushes, a few rock piles made years and years ago by hands that have passed on and work no more.”            “This path still intrigues me – as well as the Lower Field. It was the Way Out – a shining road over the shining fields – on which beckoned glorious adventures and gruesome dangers. It holds many happy memories for those who, as lads and lassies, tripped along in the gaiety of unworried youth to school or church at Sulphur Spring.”            “I can see Old Suz, the gray mule that helped raise the family, strain at the gears as she steadily tramps from end to end of the long corn rows pulling a bulltongued plow. Across the field below her, in rows already prepared by the plow, I can discern, moving slowly, slowly, with flashing, clinking hoes, a conglomeration of toilers – from age-bowed Grandpa to little tots useful only to step on hills of corn and beans already hoed or to carry tin buckets of cooling water to the workers. My mother and sisters often helped us in the fields. At noon Old Suz had such acute ears that she was first to hear the shrill call of the dinner horn, and she would instantly start straight toward the house wherever she happened to be.”             “We have spent many happy hours hunting in the Lower Field – day and night. In this field we often found signs of foxes, coons, possums, polecats, minks and partridges. One night we lay out all night by a large oak by the edge of the field in which the dogs had treed a coon. At dawn, chilled to the bone but very happy, we watched Grandpa drop the coon from the tree-top with a rifle shot.” (5)             He was a prolific writer, and helped get out many publications. In 1935, “EJ” spoke of himself to a Dickenson Memorial High School English class:            “Sutherland began to write as soon as he could borrow a piece of chalk and root some weaker fellow pupil away from the blackboard.”            “He does not know why he began to write. His recollection does not antedate his desire to read and, when he found out that what he read was just what somebody else had written, he became smitten by the author’s fever to see some of his own thoughts in print. They all get that way.* He has a small volume of poetry, ‘Remembering You,’ in the hands of a printer. He has the following volumes in course of preparation: “History of Dickenson County,” “James Sutherland and His Descendants,” “John Counts and His Descendants,” “John Amburgey and His Descendants,” and “Some Sandy Basin Characters.”** He has planned so much and completed little.” (6)            In 1917, he published a 35 page book of poems, “The Sunken Star.” In 1951, he published “In Lonesome Cove,” another volume of poetry. In 1947, he had bound in one volume called “Stray Straws,” seven previous publications. He helped plan and carry out the fiftieth birthday party for Virginia’s “Baby County” in 1930 and, twenty-five years later, edited “Meet Virginia’s Baby.” This pictorial history of Dickenson County, was described by his son Jamie in these words:            “The famous official document of the 1955 Diamond Jubilee of Dickenson County** Not just a dry ‘history book’ but a warm human account in words and pictures of the hardy pioneers and their off-spring who hewed out our ‘Diamond in the Wilderness’ from the rough ridges and meager bottomlands of the Sandy Basin.” (7)            In 1962, he published “Some Sandy Basin Characters.” At the time of his death, he and the writer were collaborating on another Dickenson County history to include data on schools and some twenty pioneer families.            He organized in 1936 the Counts Family Reunion. This reunion of one of Southwest Virginia’s largest families, has been held annually at various locations, except for four years during World War II. It has produced enormous genealogical research on the descendants of John Counts of Glade Hollow, who settled in 1787 near Lebanon in Russell County, Virginia, including Amburgey, Colley, Deel, Fuller, Kelly, Kiser, Rasnick and Sutherland families. “EJ” helped other families with their reunions – as Mullins, Musick, and Smith.            The reunions, discontinued during World War II, were renewed at Cleveland, Virginia, in 1946, with “EJ” as President. He inspired and welded the group together. Perhaps no labor of his life gave him greater satisfaction than working with this family organization. I quote from his 1946 address:            “The greatest regret that comes to your President at this time is the absence of the faces of so many of our strongest and most beloved supporters and relatives. During the past five years the Grim Reaper has continued to thrust his scythe of death among our people, and its keen blades has found many shining marks. The long list of the Counts Dead, covering the last five years, will be read to you today. You will find that hardly a family has escaped this Death Angel. This is an inexorable law of life. Death comes and reaps – but life goes on in other bodies. When we are gone, others will grasp the flag and move forward. It is the will of God.” (8)            He was an authoritative literary critic.  The book-lined shelves of his home attest to his life-long quest for any historical data. At an early age he resolved to spend one-tenth of his income on worth-while books, writing (February 8, 1906) in his diary:            “One of my most supreme desires has been* to collect a library of choice books* and have them arranged so that they will be a source of comfort and information to me and of interest and recreation to my friends and visitors. God willing, I will accomplish this.”            In 1952 he was invited to speak at an Institute of Literature at Radford College on “Literature in Southwest Virginia.” His penetrating review of histories, poems, novels, columns and other written releases was outstanding. He said he had data on at least 2000 literary items from Southwest Virginia, and deplored the poor circulation of our literary materials outside our area.            Hear “EJ” tell of adding a new book to his library:            “A Narrative of Wise County” by Charles A. Johnson – It has arrived! For months I have been itching to hold it in my hands, to open it slowly, and to feast my eyes upon its satisfying contents. No other event of like kind has ever so firmly held me in its grasp of anticipation.”            “Now I have seen it – have handled it – have pored avidly over its pages – have looked with wide eyes into a past that is dead yet liveth. Out of its pages smile faces of men and women who have toiled amid our hill-country and made it a peace and comfort – have dreamed dreams and seen visions that have amazingly come true – have laughingly faced vast dangers and chilling adversities and come forth conquerors over them all, to leave to the sons and daughters thru the ages a record of honor and a land of promise and fulfillment – an engrossing chronicle ably told – an authentic cross section of the life of our own people by the facile hands of one of the actors in the picture unfolded – a story of the rich and poor, the white and the black, the saint and the sinner.” (9)            He was a master of description of facts and events. His grandparents had helped settle the Sandy Basin. He talked with many persons and secured their “Recollections” of pioneer days. He saw with his own eyes most of the changes that came to his native county on the very headwaters of the Basin. In spite of multiple responsibilities, he went to more funerals, meetings or other important events than most people do. He joined a vast throng near Carbo, on Clinch River, June 30, 1934, gathered at the home of “Aunt Rachael” Kiser, a granddaughter of “Jamie the Scotchman” Sutherland, to observe her one hundredth birthday. He thought on the changes that had come during this centenarian’s lifetime and wrote:            “In this immediate neighborhood she has lived her whole long life. She is the last of her generation. All her twelve brothers and cousins are dead. She has helped rear four later generations, and is now the only living link on the Clinch that connects the Jackson era with the Roosevelt era. Over these long years she has seen startling changes. The forests have been pushed back to the hill-tops and even they have only scrubby trees and bushes; new fields have been cleared and new houses built in every direction; gone are the wolves, the bear, the deer and other big game, leaving only a few marauding foxes and scudding rabbits; bridle paths have changed to hazardous wagon roads, and they in turn have widened and straightened into modern highways, many of them hard-surfaced and permanent; automobiles and trucks have chased the horse-drawn vehicles from the roads; water-mills are almost gone, vanquished by the gas engine; log cabins have disappeared and in their places have appeared painted bungalows, or flimsy slattern boxed hovels the railroad, built in 1890 along Clinch River in sight of Aunt Rach’s door has brought transportation and wealth to farmers and stock raisers; numerous farm and home conveniences have lightened and quickened the labors of the whole family; many of the younger generations have gone out from this little community to people the whole nation. Verily she has watched the face of the country, and the lives of the inhabitants, change immeasurably during the last hundred years.” (10)            He helped gather and preserve examples of our mountain folk-lore. In his collection “Folk Games from Frying Pan Creek,” published in Southern Folklore Quarterly in December 1946, “EJ” defends his heritage and contends that some of the old plays were used by the nobility of England and Scotland centuries ago, and that they were “good enough” for our American grandparents. All older Frying Pan settlers knew them.            The Library of Congress has many recordings of folk songs gathered with “EJ’s” aid in the county. One of the singers was Mrs. Hetty Austin Swindall, his wife’s aunt. A duplicate of Mrs. Swindall’s songs, preserved in the Library of Congress, has just been secured by his granddaughter.             An old song, “Needle’s Eye,” was also known in North Carolina and Kentucky. Jesse Stuart took a line from it as title for one of his books, “The Thread That Runs So True,” the story of a Kentucky mountain school teacher:             “Needle’s eye, you must supply                 The thread that runs so true;            I have gained all that is in this house,                 Now I have just gained you.” (11)            He published in 1940 in the Southern Folklore Quarterly, “Vance’s Song.” Richard Chase depended on him in his search for folklore of the Appalachian Mountains. Dr. Arthur Kyle Davis of the University of Virginia found his folklore collection of the best.            He helped organize the Historical Society of Southwest Virginia. As an officer, he wrote the Constitution and By-laws adopted by this society March 17, 1961. With membership of approximately one hundred, the society promotes historical studies and preservation of manuscripts. Its meetings rotate quarterly between the six counties it serves – Buchanan, Dickenson, Lee, Russell, Scott and Wise. Four publications have been released by the society. The first, containing one sketch and pertinent information about the society, was prepared and placed in the hands of the publisher by “EJ” who did not live to see it come off the press. Each of the other three contains some eight to ten sketches. His will stipulates that his historical collection “be kept together and displayed and known as the ‘Elihu J. Sutherland Collection’, and plans are for these to be deposited in the Archives of the Historical Society at Clinch Valley College in Wise where space has been set aside for the society’s materials.            He helped get better roads. Then other improvements were soon to follow. He participated in hearings before the Board of Supervisors and the Virginia Department of Highways. He was constantly working for highway improvement, making before and after pictures of roads, and he burst into poetic song when he saw the first snowplow on Frying Pan Creek;             “Long, long ago the pioneers built homes            About this valley, hidden in the hills,            They fought the beasts and cleared the                 virgin slopes.            And drank clear water from its singing rills.            They never, since the settlement began,            Dared dream of snow-plows come to                 Frying Pan.” (12)            “EJ’s” contribution to highways is shown in a letter from Lon B. Rogers, Chairman of the Breaks Interstate Park Commission:            “With the arrival of this week’s DICKENSONIAN, I learned for the first time that Mrs. Sutherland wished flowers omitted and money given for the Blowing Rock Road in his memory. I am happy to enclose a check for this purpose.”            ****Without Highway 80, it can be safely said that there would be no Interstate Breaks Park today. Judge Sutherland was one of the promoters of that Highway Association and of the Breaks Interstate Park** it was his suggestion that we compromise on the name** E. J. was one of the organizers of the Breaks Park Association, which after the compact between Kentucky and Virginia, signed in 1964, was changed to BREAKS INTERSTATE PARK ASSOCIATION.**            “It would be most appropriate for the Blowing Rock Trail to be named in his honor** (13)            He loved nature and the outdoors, and was constantly recording his feelings about the changing seasons. “E” often enjoyed hikes with his wife and others to Blowing Rock and Birch Knob (two highest points in Dickenson County), and other places. As a child he was fascinated when he could view from his home the 3000 foot pinnacle on the Virginia-Kentucky border. He made “A Trip to Old Baldy” in 1956 and wrote:            “I resolved to scale its ramparts some day and view the unknown lands on the other side of that mountain wall. I had no thought then that it would be more than sixty years before I would accomplish that childish resolution** I crossed our continent and visited Mexico and Canada before I finished my homeland exploration.”       (14)            In an editorial entitled simply “EJ” (The Dickensonian, July 17, 1964), Glenn Kiser, wrote:            “He spent a lot of time exploring the more inaccessible areas of the county, particularly Cumberland Mountain for which he formed a great affection as a boy at his ancestral home on the ridge above Frying Pan Creek. He resolved then that some day he would walk the crest of that rugged ridge from Pound Gap above Jenkins, Kentucky, to The Breaks. **EJ walked sections of it at odd intervals when he could find the time.** That task he completed at the age of 75.”            He was recognized to have a true poetic nature. He published two books of delicate verse – “The Sunken Star” in 1917, and “In Lonesome Cove” in 1951. The second volume was dedicated to his devoted wife, who, he said, gave invaluable service as typist, research assistant, and in improving the style and contents of his published volumes.            In The Dickensonian, October 17, 1960, Glen Kiser commented on the Poetic inclinations of Elihu Jasper Sutherland:             “His poems, written at odd intervals in his extremely busy life, accurately reflect the gentle melancholy and loneliness of the people of the Cumberlands. In his poetry, Judge Sutherland never puts techniques ahead of heartfelt emotions and cherished values of the people and the region he celebrates. Dialect poems, poems commorating great epochs in the history of our nation – all are handled with the same easy competence of language, and all show the author’s preoccupation with the basic human concerns with stir men’s hearts everwhere and in all ages. His poems are reservoirs of spiritual peace and replenishment.”            In Lonesome Cove, he breathes A Prayer                 “Lord, give me strength to move the stones                      From out my neighbor’s way;                 And may I see him smile his thanks                      Before I pass away.

my old wrought iron cemetery fence

If you ask my children about traveling to Mimi’s in the old Volvo station wagon, they would immediately recount the time we brought cemetery fencing and a huge gate back to Florida from Virginia. From my point of view, the 100 year old wrought iron fencing was too wonderful to pass up and, after all, I had a station wagon.

Thank you girls for indulging Mama and being so patient ~

2013-09-11 08.52.07

My little ones were under 10 and every year when we went to Virginia to visit, they usually stretched out in the back of the car for the long 700 mile trek. On this trip back home, we threw blankets over the fencing for padding and hit the road. Yes, I felt slightly guilty about putting my children in that position, but I had to have it!  And – I still enjoy it after all these years.

I must say that one of my favorite adventures acquired from researching ancestors is visiting cemeteries; especially the older ones with their charm and ornate headstones and antique fencing. While visiting the grave of Altha Rudolph Brooks Davis, my maternal grandmother, I noticed by the maintenance shed that the grounds crew had removed the entire fencing and gate from an old cemetery plot. HOW COULD THEY?

When I inquired, I was told that the family wanted the fence removed, and that it would be thrown away.
THROWN AWAY? – I COULD NEVER LET THAT HAPPEN!

MAPLEWOOD - Davis Altha R. Brooks Grandma Davis 1884-1980  MAPLEWOOD CEMETERY

2013-09-11 08.52.54

For many years the old wrought iron fence had protected a family plot at the Maplewood Cemetery in Tazewell, Virginia. Made by Stewart Iron Works, Cincinnati, Ohio by the Stewart family whose roots were in blacksmithing. The emblem on my gate is difficult to read today due to the corrosion and rust over the years. …but I wouldn’t change a thing about it.

2013-09-11 08.52.25  stewardironworks-old_shield

I’ve decided to share my fence at the Sweet South French Country Flea Market on October 19th, 9-4. Yesterday, my husband was kind enough to cut (yes – that kind of gives me the heebie jeebies) one piece of fencing into sections that others may use in their own vintage home or garden. Because I needed a rusty, crusty piece of 3-pickets to hang in my house, I decided to make 7 small pieces available at the market. Two 6-picket pieces at $65 each, two 3-picket pieces at $50 each and 3 single pickets (price to be determined when I figure out how useful they are??).

2013-09-10 11.31.04 2013-09-10 11.31.47 2013-09-10 11.32.41

I can only hope that the new owners of these special pieces will enjoy them half as much as I do. Perhaps I should take applications to determine their new homes. maybe Adopt-a-fence so I can come by and check on them…. just kidding!

Daugherty

I have had a couple of inquiries about the DAUGHERTY line and although I don’t have a huge amount of documentation, I’ll share what I have. Here is the pedigree chart from my line. (I’ll add a better image soon)

I do have a connection with Daugherty researcher with well documented records. I’ll share links and contact information  here if I obtain approval.
Daugherty to MJD pedigree

[Letcher -Houston Family.FTW] source (RS)

The James, William and Nancy are uncle/aunt to your John L, not brothers and sister.  They are brothers and sister to the father of John L., John Dougherty that married Hannah Letcher.

John that married Hannah Letcher; James that married ELizabeth Hamilton; William that married Ruth Towson and Nancy Ann that married Jacob Leese; were brothers and sister, having traveled from Strabane, Co. Tyrone, N/ Ireland prior to 1791 to Delaware, Maryland and ultimately into Virginia.

John Dougherty:

From Rockbridge County Records:

=======================================================

Extracts from the records of Rockbridge County, VA:
Rockbridge County to Wit.
John Dougherty & William Dougherty come before me & made oath that Ann Dougherty, their sister
who is about to intermarry with Jacob Leese is above the age of twenty one years of their own
knowledge, & that there is no fraud or —–sion practiced, or about to be practiced in order to obtain a license for said intended marriage. Given under my hand this 10th day of November 1802
A. Reid C.R.C.

————————————-

David A. Daugherty & Nancy L. (Moore) Daugherty are my 2nd great grand uncle and aunt.

DAUGHERTY David_Daugherty_brother_to_Mary_Jane_Daughtery_Gregory

I uncovered some of my Daugherty connection in an old scrapbook of newspaper clippings obits, marriage announcements, calling cards etc. that belonged to my Grandmother Buckland. Fortunately, or by divine intervention it was preserved instead of being tossed into the trash. My dad (the railroader) kept the old scrapbook after his mother’s death in 1960, and I received it after he passed away in 1993. Above all, this is one of my most treasured possessions. It would not have been of interest to most anyone else in the family, but it has opened the door to discovering my roots unknown to any living relatives.

Dad and I tried to find the old Marrs Cemetery in Falls Mills, Virginia, but to no avail. However a good many years later, my two brothers agreed upon my insistence that we try again. And we succeeded.  The once sacred ground was being used as a horse pasture and probably by now, the animals have nearly destroyed the headstones forever loosing placement of the community’s deceased. (a rant for another day).

MARRS - Daugherty David MARRS - Daugherty Nannie L. Daugherty 1836-1918

There lies, David A. Daugherty 1836-1904 and his beloved wife Nannie Lane Moore Daugherty 1836-1918. (I understand that Nannie was related to Captain James  Moore – who was massacred, along with much of his family in Abbs Valley, Virginia.)

From a page of Mary Jane Davidson’s scrapbook below, we read her great uncle’s obit.

OBITUARY Daugherty David 1836-1904

Interestingly, there is an additional clue to another relative previously unknown, Virginia’s Civil War Governor, John Letcher.

In Grandmother’s clipping below we read kind words apparently said by Reverend Daugherty proclaimed at the funeral of a dearly departed.

WORDS Daugherty David A

OBITUARY Unrelated David A Daughtery Minister

The precious glued papers of the book revealed the obit of  Mrs. M.J. Gregory, grandmother to Mary Jane Davidson and for whom she was named. Mary Jane Gregory (Daugherty) 1826-1897) was David Daugherty’s sister, both children of John L. Daugherty (1799-1868) and Nancy Ward (b. abt. 1802). MJ & David had two other siblings, Isaac W. Daugherty (1828-1850) and George C. Daugherty (1829-1800).

Mary Jane Daugherty married Daniel Parham Gregory on July 22, 1851.

Nancy Ward (daughter of  Virginia pioneer David Ward) married John L. Daugherty/Dougherty October 6, 1825. They are my 3rd great grandparents.

OBITUARY Gregory Mary Jane (Daugherty) 1826-1897

The Daniel Gregory Cemetery is  LOCATED ON RT 61, OPPOSITE CHESTNUT GROVE CHRISTIAN CHURCH AT SHAWVERS MILL. (Daniel P. Gregory, Footstone for his wife MJG, Daniel’s mother, Elizabeth H. Gregory, Nehemiah Findley, Nancy J.E. Cundiff, Robert J. Kidd, Footstone, EPG) (Photo by Judy Llamas)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Isaac Daugherty is buried at the Jeffersonville Cemetery in Tazewell, Virginia. His headstone was broken and propped up against another, so the exact location is not known. To date, I do not know more about brother George C. Daugherty.

JEFFERSONVILLE Cemetery Tazewell VA

JEFFERSONVILLE CEMETERY DAUGHERTY Isaac W 1828-1856 unreadable JEFFERSONVILLE CEMETERY DAUGHERTY Isaac W 1828-1856 footstone IWD 3

What is this blog about?

It’s a reasonable question to ask, “Who is The Railroader’s Daughter and WHAT is this blog about? If you’re following this blog, you may wonder why you started following it.

Perhaps, your interest lies in railroads or the old bustling towns of Bluefield, WV and Bluefield, VA, built around the rise of the railroad industry.

On the other hand, you may be my family and you’ve been supportive of my efforts to uncover mounds of genealogy relating to our mountain roots in Russell, Tazewell and Mercer Counties and our relatives who fought to protect their families from the Indians and who were instrumental in establishing county governments and founding towns.

You may be an antique enthusiastic who shares my love of old things, primitive utilitarian items that tell a story of the pioneer ancestors who blazed the trails down through the Shenandoah Valley and into Southwest Virginia.

You may be totally unrelated to any of the above and just like the vintage junk that I drag home and transform into something fun or functional. Whatever the case…..

what is

Evolving over a period of years, The Railroader’s Daughter is an attempt to bring together all the things I’ve learned and loved. You’ll find an array of information, images, family history and surnames as they connect to my roots. There is a page of vintage finds for sale. I also showcase a collection of hand-me-down personal family items that reveal a glimpse into a child growing up in the mountains of southwest Virginia –  a lifestyle I now treasure.

Both of my grandfathers and several great uncles, my father and three of his brothers, one of my brothers and many of our cousins, my husband and I have all worked for the railroad. There have been good times, bad times – stories of coal mines and accidents, floods and survivals, living on the rails and beautifying the railway. It’s a strange way of life to many modern families, but a wonderfully exciting life for those who have experienced the romance of a dining car breakfast with fine linens, a childhood dream of a trip in the Norfolk & Western observation car or the stories of ancestors who moved all their worldly possessions in a boxcar. It’s a plethora of adventure.

I am The Railroader’s Daughter!  I am old enough to have learned a few things and to realize that those who came before me knew a little somethin’ about life. They had it harder than I have it. I appreciate my parents because they cared enough to teach me respect for my elders and how to say, yes ma’am, no sir and thank you. Although I moved away from the beautiful mountains of southwest Virginia when I was only 21,  I well up with pride when I brag about East River Mountain and Ward’s Cove and my roots in Appalachia.

Thanks for visiting, and I hope you’ll come back soon.

The Engineman’s Tallow Pot

Before the widespread use of petroleum oils in the late nineteenth century, tallow — animal fat — was a useful lubricant for steam locomotives. Firemen and engineers used tallow pots to lubricate the cylinders of moving locomotives.   source

This tallow pot belonged to dad, Larkin Watson Buckland, Jr. and he used it during his days on the steam engines working both as a fireman and then an engineer on the Norfolk & Western.

2013-06-18 08.15.21

The oil can below belonged to my grandfather, L.W. Buckland, SR who was also a fireman, then engineer.

lwsr oil can

See how they used the oil can on a steam engine. This photo taken from (source)rail_str_0260_01

The Modern Railroad (1911)

“I lift up my eyes to the mountains…”

Just down the road from where I grew up, a woman named Jenny lives in the house of her childhood. She is an amazing photographer of birds, flowers, family and of our mountain. Throughout the year she posts pictures of our beautiful East River Mountain on Facebook, and I love to see those images.  Since Mom still lives about 1/4 mile away in a house facing this spectacular sight, I have Jenny’s birds-eye view (even though I’m 700 miles away) and know what the weather is like for Mom that day.
This morning Jenny posted a scripture and a message. I hope it inspires you as much as it did me. Thank you Jenny!
‘I look outside every morning to the same beautiful view my ancestors have seen before me. I say this scripture, that for generations has meant so much to my family,  from Psalm 121:1-2: “I lift up my eyes to the mountains—where does my help come from? My help comes from the Lord, the Maker of heaven and earth.”
This devotion really touched my heart and soul. Thank you Rev. Ray.’
Jenny Parris Akers East River Mountain 2013
The traveler app…roaches a distant mountain and all of it is in view. From a distance one might believe that it is easy to climb. The view is different at the foot of that same mountain. There all thoughts of an easy expedition vanish: it is tall, steep and deep. Step inside it’s forest door and the mountain becomes alive with character of sights, sounds and smell. It’s breeze touches you as though it was breathing an invitation to climb and explore the unsearchable ways of its creator.
The weary travelers of old would look out at the distant road they had to walk to get home. There were mountains and valleys to cross and go through. The trip would be with hot days and dark nights. They would travel together, no one should walk alone. There was no turning back; they would journey forward toward a better land; and they would find strength for the journey in a question and an answer.
The question came as they lifted their eyes to view the hilly path before them: “Where does my help come from?” The answer was (and is) always the same. “My help comes from the Lord who made heaven and earth.” (Psalm 121)
Don’t give up when the way seems impossible. Ask the question and affirm the answer, then keep walking. We get to the top of each mountain by walking with God. The view is always different from the top then it was at the foot. From there you can see where you are going and where you have been. You also see something else: That God is high and lifted up, faithful, and greatly to be praised.
Grace and Peace,   Rev Ray

Rev. Raymond Amos
First United Methodist Church
Elizabethton, TN