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On this day…. Larkin & Larkin!

This is a very special day as I wish my nephew, William Larkin Buckland, a  very Happy Birthday. Will, I hope your day is full of joy and celebration!

BUCKLAND Buckeye Will 10-8-98 8-14 20in BUCKLAND William Larkin Buckland

BUCKLAND Wm Larkin Buckland BUCKLAND William Larkin Buckland 4 BUCKLAND William Larkin Buckland 1  2013-04-26 06.37.48

I remember my dad, too;  the Railroader for whom Will was named, Larkin Watson Buckland, Jr.

According to thinkbabynames.com, Larkin l(a)-rkin,  a boy’s name is of Irish and Gaelic origin, and the meaning of Larkin is “rough, fierce”. Larkin is not a popular first name for men but a very popular surname or last  name for all people (#1421 out of 88799). (1990 U.S. Census)

BUCKLAND LW Jr 1965

The Railroader loved his grandchildren so much and he would have delighted in having Will named after him. His grandchildren loved him too and were sad when he passed away in 1993.

One granddaughter wrote about her grandpa…

My hero is definitely my grandpa. I love him a lot! When I was little, my grandpa would take me out on a boat. I would blow a whistle and scare the fish away, but he didn’t mind. I’d spill the fish and let them go, but he just laughed.

I was very troublesome when I was little. Everyone would yell at me. I’d go to my room and talk to my toys. My grandpa would come in and tell me everything would be fine as long as I wore my smile.

In the summer, we went to visit him in the hospital. He gave me an apple and told me it would keep the hospital away. I laughed.

On November 6th I went to Mac & Bob’s with my dad. A few hours later, my dad called. My hero had died. I wasn’t laughing anymore, I was crying.

Now when I think of him, I think, “My hero”.

Christa Buckland (age 10)

BUCKLAND Christa at Joella BUCKLAND Christa 4th grade

BUCKLAND Christa -

 

BUCKLAND LW JR Funeral 1993

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Granny Haley lived along the Clinch River in Russell County, VA

Daughter of Joseph Kiser Jr and Mary “Polly” Childers, my 2nd great grandmother, Mahala Kiser was born October 18, 1832 and died January 20, 1925. In those days, the Sutherlands settled on one side of the Clinch River and the Kiser’s on the other. It appears that there was a lot of Kiser-Sutherland, Sutherland-Kiser relatives in Russell County, Virginia. Granny Haley (as referred to by cousin Joe Kiser) married Jesse Sutherland on September 18, 1851 and the union resulted in 15 children. Joe could also remember that Granny Haley smoked a corncob pipe.
KISER Mahala_Kiser_Sutherland

In 1924, Mahala stated: “I married Jessee … and came here to live in September 1851. The house we are now living in was built later … Not long after we were married, I went across Clinch River to visit Daddy’s. Coming back, I started to row the canoe across the river, but the pole broke and I fell in deep water. Jesse happened to be working near and saw me fall in. He rushed in and, though I was much heavier than him, he got me in the canoe and saved me from drowning … (she could not swim; she always said that thereafter she thought Jesse was the biggest, bravest and strongest man she ever saw) … Jesse helped run a water mill. During the Civil War, Jesse was a member of Capt R. M. Hager’s Co. but was later detailed back home as blacksmith and “horse’shoer” for the community. Jesse belonged to the Mis-sionary Baptist Church, the same to which I belong. It was the old Sulphur Spring Church on Mill Creek, which was later moved to Cleveland. Jesse is buried next to Daniel in the family cemetery on the homeplace out there be-side the railroad.” E. J. Sutherland’s Some Descendants of John Counts, Sutherland Appendix C-25 pg 374, Kiser D-11, pg 334

HOUSE SUTHERLAND - Jessee Mahala

Mahala and Jesse resided in the home above. It is my understanding that there was a door on the house (similar to a sliding barn door) so that the family could bring in the horses to keep them from being stolen when the soldiers came through their land during the Civil War.

Jesse Sutherland and Mahala Kiser had the following family:

117 i. MATILDA4 was born 11 July 1854
ii. PHOEBE (#1489) was born 6 September 1856. Phoebe died 17 April 1860 at 3 years of age.
iii. MARY P. (#1490) was born 8 May 1858. Mary died 26 October 1891 at 33 years of age.
iv. EMILY JANE (#1491) was born 9 November 1859. She married JOHNSTON BAXTER KISER . (Johnston Baxter Kiser is #1880.) Johnston was born 1849. Johnston was the son of Nimrod Kiser and Martha ‘Mattie’ Childers.
118 v. SARAH ‘SALLIE’ was born 3 June 1861
vi. ALABAMA (#1493) was born 22 March 1863. She married THOMAS DAVIS . (Thomas Davis is #7411.) Thomas was the son of Jeff Davis.
vii. THOMAS A. (#1494) was born 27 October 1865. Thomas died 19 January 1956 at 90 years of age. He married TABITHA FIELDS . (Tabitha Fields is #7413.) Tabitha died 1950. In 1950, Thomas stated: “My parents lived with my grandparents, DANIEL SUTHERLAND and his wife PHOEBE. I lived there with my parents until their deaths, and then until this summer when my wife died. Afterwards I moved down here with ELIHU KISER and his wife, whom we reared. … When I was a boy … would go to the big bottom just opposite the mouth of Dumps Creek … found several Indian skeletons. Every time the Clinch got up it would wash up the Indian bones along the river bank. We would hunt along the bank and when we found a dark spot in the ground we would dig … We would always find bones, beads and pottery. The bones were old and brittle. I do not know where any of these things are now.” They had no children. SUTHERLAND D-119 pg 375
119 viii. MARGARET P. was born 14 April 1867
ix. JOSEPH (#1496) was born 16 September 1868. Joseph died 27 February 1907 at 38 years of age. He married ROSIE COMBS . (Rosie Combs is #7416.) Rosie was the daughter of William Combs and Mary.
120 x. SAMUEL PERRY was born 25 June 1870
xi. DANIEL (#1498) was born 20 April 1872.

Bluefield Newspaper, 1925
Becky Chafiin – Oct 12, 2008 View | Viewers Mrs. Sutherland left a Host of Descendants Mrs. Mahala Sutherland, aged ninety-three years, grandmother of Mrs. J. E. Anderson and Mrs. H.J. McGrain, both of Bluefield, died at Carbo, Va., last Wednesday. Mrs. Sutherland was buried on Friday with her progeny of five generations present. She was a native of Russell County and was born October 18th, 1832. Before her marriage she was Miss Mahala Kiser. She married Jesse Sutherland on September 18, 1851, who died October 10, 1913, following sixty two years of happy married life. To this union fifteen children were born, seven of whom survive. There are also surviving sixty one grandchildren, 146 great-grandchildren and sixteen great-great grandchildren. Mrs. Sutherland was a member of the Missionary Baptist church for forty-eight years and was widely known throughout south-west Virginia.

my thoughts on… The Railroader’s Country Music

I recently ran across these thoughts that I posted just before a trip I made “back home” to Bluefield on 4-29-2009.

Growing up in the mountains of southwest Virginia, I was forced by my daddy to listen to country music. Well, I suppose he didn’t force me. I could‘a gone outside to play, but he when he was home, I ‘spect I hung out with him a lot. He was gone so much workin’ on the railroad, and when he wasn’t gone workin’ on the railroad, he was gone drinkin’. But when he was around, he listened to country music on the only television station that we could pick up, way out there on 460. Now his music was not like what you see on the Country Music Award Show today. Daddy’s favorite was pure heart-breakin’ back woods mountain music. He would watch the Porter Wagoner Show when Porter had as much glitz as Liberace. Standing on the Grand Ole Opry stage, Porter showed off his sequined wagon-wheel jacket and sang along side the big-haired blonde, Dolly Parton. They sang that ole “cryin’ in the ye beer” type music until it would make my tender ears bleed in agony. Whispering Bill Anderson, Little Jimmy Dickens and the local guy, Cecil Surrett, were talented men to my daddy. There was even a band of young fellows that my brother sarcastically referred to as SALVATION. I think that is because they always sang that salvation song and whined the notes right through their nose. My daddy loved those twangy sounds.

Cecil Surratthillbilly musicMel+Streetporter wagoner and dolly parton

With all that said, you understand that I have very little use for my daddy’s country music. Strangely enough, when I hear those familiar instruments of mountain music, I long to go back. Back to Virginia. Back to a time when I didn’t know anything but that. I am transported to places where people put a smile on my face and warmth in my heart. I am drawn to the mountains where I was born and raised. Mom always said that I ‘got above my raisin’ and maybe I did in some ways. But I am always proud of where I came from and the people that worked so hard in those mountains. That is what makes me who I am.

BUCKLAND LW JR (Buddy)

Buddy Buckland

BUCKLAND LW JrJuly 1958

Buddy Buckland 1958

GREGORY Thompson and uk Shufflebarger

Thompson Gregory & wife ? Sufflebarger

CARBAUGH Aunt Grace & Bill

Aunt Grace Davis & Bill Carbaugh

DAVIS Altha and Gilmer Jordan

Altha Davis & grandson Gilmer Jordan

DAVIS Lacy Clarence Davis, Sr.

Uncle Lacy Clarence Davis

MUNDY Lettie Russell Davis 1913-2007

Aunt Lettie Russel Davis Mundy

GRAHAM Frankie 2

Aunt Frankie Buckland Graham

BROOKS Charles AND Nancy Boyd son of John & Elizabeth Brooks

Great Grand Uncle Charles & wife Nancy Jane Boyd Brooks

DAVIS JoElla, Grandma, Grace, Lucille, Russell, Lillian

The Railroader’s House

In the fall of 1966, the railroader “bought a house and road it home“, or at least that’s how he described it. Dad, Mom, my brother Larry and I lived on Route 460, west of Bluefield, VA when Virginia DOT upgraded the highway to accommodate 4-lanes of traffic. In doing so, the state purchased many homes/land along the south side of the old 2-lane road for their right of way. Those homes were then sold at auction and the winner of the auction had to move the houses to another location. I remember Bob Chapman from Bank of Tazewell County purchases two or three homes and relocated them just west of Bailey Switch. Three more, including a quaint rock house were relocated to an area west of Shawver’s store.

The railroader purchased this small frame house that once stood across from the White Kitchen Skating Rink. The best I can remember, dad paid about $400 for the home. Other expenses included of course, moving the building, building a foundation and basement on the new lot, and all the additional expense of plumbing/wiring, etc. All in all, the way we see it today – that was a great deal!

Buddy's house Sunset News News-Observer, Friday Sept 2, 1966

The area’s afternoon newspaper (yes, we had two newspapers in those days) the Sunset News ran a feature story on the event and published this image. Dad always got a kick out of saying, “I bought a house and rode it home”. He literally did. I remember (age 12) seeing him on top of the house as they moved down the road. He and several other men had sticks in their hands to lift the power lines out of the way. They held the lines high while walking the length of the house as the house on a big wheeled truck moved slowly west on 460.

Mom was pleased to finally have a house of her own.

The 1946 Wreck of N&W’s Pride & Joy – The Powhatan Arrow

The Railroader, L.W. Buckland, Jr., recounted to me his relationship with the tragedy many years ago and kept a copy of the Bluefield Daily Telegraph that reported the accident. As dad told me the story, it was with heart-felt words and with a look in his eyes that he knew he had been saved from death on that dreadful day in 1946. There is no doubt in my mind, and I believe he absolutely understood, that it was by divine intervention that he was not a part of the crew onboard Engine #604 the Powhatan Arrow the day it wrecked in Powhatan, WV.

As a young fireman on the Norfolk & Western Railway,  Dad said that he had been working this run from the extra board while the regular Fireman, Beecher Lawson was marked off on vacation. On the day of this accident, the fireman marked back up for his regular assignment as fireman on the prestigious passenger train, relieving  L.W. from the job and back to the fireman’s extra board.

Copy of PowhatanArrow689A      BUCKLAND  LW_jr_RR

The Powhatan Arrow made it’s maiden voyage in April of 1946, just two months prior to this accident. Steam engine crews enjoyed the speeds they could attain on those engines and as is no surprise, the cause of the accident was listed a “excessive speed on a curve”. The second picture is of the railroader in later years and an enginemen on a diesel.

According to: (source-Bramwell,WV) Two Bluefield railroad men were killed and two others injured in this Norfolk and Western train wreck at Powhatan, West Virginia, 18 miles west of Bluefield, WV. Engineer Grover C. “Nap” Roberts and fireman Beecher Lawson were killed when the eastbound crack stream-liner “Powhatan Arrow” left the tracks…Eleven passengers were hurt in the wreck. This deluxe train was eastbound from Cincinnati, OH to Norfolk, VA. Several thousand people from Mercer and McDowell counties were attracted to the wreck. It was reported that automobiles lined both sides of the highway for more than a half mile. The “Powhatan Arrow” had made it’s maiden run on 27 April, 1946.

Powhatan Arrow June 12 1946

       Photos by United States C & C Co. and furnished by Kermit Blizzard, BHS Class ’46 

OFFICIAL REPORT (source – E.L. “Diz” Harris)

File Number 2997  Railroad NORFOLK & WESTERN RAILWAY  Date 06/12/1946  Location POWHATAN, WV.  Accident Type D.

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION – WASHINGTON – INVESTIGATION NO. 2997

NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY REPORT IN RE ACCIDENT AT POWHATAN, W. VA., ON JUNE 12, 1946

Inv-2997

SUMMARY

Railroad: Norfolk and Western

Date: June 12, 1946

Location: Powhatan, West Virginia

Kind of accident: Derailment

Train involved: Passenger

Train number: 26

Engine number: 604

Consist: 7 Cars

Estimated speed: Approximately 55 m. p. h.

Operation: Timetable, train orders and automatic block-signal system

Track: Double 12 degrees 54’curve; 1.254 percent ascending grade eastward

Weather: Raining

Time: 3:18 p.m.

Casualties: 2 killed; 27 injured

Cause: Excessive speed on curve

 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION

INVESTIGATION NO. 299

IN THE MATTER OF MAKING ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORTS UNDER THE ACCIDENT REPORTS ACT OF MAY 6, 1910.

NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY

July 31, 1946.

 

Accident at Powhatan, W. Va., on June 12, 1946, caused by excessive speed on a curve,

REPORT OF THE COMMISSION

PATTERSON, Commissioner:

 

On June 12, 1946, there was a derailment of a passenger train on the Norfolk and Western Railway at Powhatan, W. Va. which resulted in the death of 2 train-service employees, and the injury of 23 passengers, 3 dining-car employees and 1 train-service employee. Diagram Inv. No. 2997 Norfolk and Western Railway Powhatan, W. Va. June 12, 1946. Location of Accident and Method of Operation: This accident occurred on that part of the Pocahontas Division extending between Williamson and Bluefield, W. Va., 99.57 miles, a double-track line, equipped with an overhead catenary system for the electric propulsion of trains. In the vicinity of the point of accident trains moving with the current of traffic are operated by timetable, train orders and an automatic block-signal system. The accident occurred on the eastward main track 79.12 miles east of Williamson; at a point 757 feet west of the station at Powhatan. From the west there are, in succession, a tangent 1,220 feet in length, an 8 degrees 53’curve to the left 1,103 feet, a tangent 430 feet, a 4 degrees 02’curve to the right 800 feet, a tangent 425 feet and a 12 degrees 54’curve to the right 220 feet to the point of accident and 535 feet eastward. The grads for east-hound trains varies between 1.175 percent and 1.036 percent ascending 4,000 feet, then it is, successively, practically level 800 feet, 1.325 percent ascending 800 feet arid 1.254 percent ascending 1,093 feet to the point of accident and 200 feet eastward. In the vicinity of the point of accident a siding lies between the main tracks. The west siding-switch is 443 feet east of the point of derailment. On the curve on which the accident occurred, the track structure consists of 131-pound rail, 39 feet in length, laid new in 1944 on an average of 22 treated ties to the rail length. It is fully tie plated with double shoulder tie-plates, double spiked, provided with 6-hole angle bars equipped with joint springs, and an average of 9 rail anchors per rail length, and is ballasted with crushed stone to a depth of 24 inches. The maximum super elevation on the curve was 5 inches, and the gage varied between 4 feet 8-1/2 inches and 4 feet 8-7/8 inches. At the point of derailment the super elevation was 5 inches and the gage was 4 feet 8-3/4 inches.

The maximum authorized speed for passenger trains on the curve involved is 35 miles per hour. A speed-limit sign bearing the numerals 35/28 is located immediately south of the south rail of the eastward main track, at a point 1,067 feet west of the west end of this curve. On tangent track the maximum authorized speed for passenger trains is 40 miles per hour.

Description of Accident

No. 26, an east-bound first-class passenger train, consisted of steam engine 604, a 4-8-4 type, three coaches, one dining car, and three coaches, in the order named. All cars were of steel construction. This train passed Eckman, the last open office, 4 miles west of Powhatan, at 3:12 p.m., 9 minutes late, and while it was moving at a speed estimated to have been approximately 55 miles per hour the engine and the first two cars were derailed.

The engine and tender stopped on their left sides on the westward main track and practically in line with it, with the front end of the engine 373 feet east of the point of derailment. The first car became detached from the tender and stopped with the front end against the near end of the tender, and leaned to the north at an angle of about 45 degrees. The second car, remaining coupled to the first and third cars, stopped practically upright on the roadbed, and at an angle of about 15 degrees to the track. The engine and tender were badly damaged, and the first two cars were considerably damaged,

It was raining at the time of the accident, which occurred about 3:18 p.m.

The engineer and the fireman were killed, and the conductor was injured. The, total weight of engine 604 in working order is 494,000 pounds, distributed as follows; Engine truck, 101,600 pounds; driving wheels, 282,000 pounds; and trailer truck, 104,400 pounds. The specified diameters of the engine-truck wheels, the driving wheels and the trailer-truck wheels are, respectively, 36, 70 and. 42 inches. The rigid wheelbase of the engine is 18 feet 9 inches long, the total length of the engine wheelbase is 47 feet 3-1/2 inches, and the total length of the engine and tender is 109 feet 2-1/4 inches. The tender is rectangular in shape and is equipped with two 6-wheel trucks. Its capacity is 20,000 gallons of water and 35 tons of coal. The weight of the tender loaded is 378,600 pounds. The center of gravity of the engine is 77 inches above the, tops of the rails and the center of gravity of the tender when fully loaded is 79 inches above the tops of the rails. The engine is provided with No. 8-ET brake, equipment and a speedometer. The journals of the engine and tender and the cars of No. 26 are provided with roller bearings. The cars of No. 26 are provided with tightlock couplers. The tender was equipped at its rear end with a type E coupler.

Discussion

No. 26 was moving on a l2 degrees 54’curve to the right when the engine and the first two cars were derailed. The engine overturned to the left arid stopped 373 feet beyond the point of derailment. The maximum authorized speed for this train in the territory immediately west of this curve was 40 miles per hour, and on the curve it was 35 miles per hour.

There was no defective condition of the engine prior to the accident. There was no indication of dragging equipment, defective track, or of any obstruction having been on the track Examination of the engine after the accident disclosed that the automatic and independent brake, valves were running position, the throttle lever was in closed position, and the reverse lever was latched on the quadrant in about 25 percent cut-off position for forward motion. There was no condition found that would prevent proper application of the train, brakes. As the, train was approaching the point where the derailment occurred, the members of the train crew were in various locations throughout the cars of the train. These employees said that the cars had been riding smoothly, and they were not aware of anything being wrong until the derailment occurred. They were unable to give an accurate estimate of the speed of the train, or to give definite information as to whether a service application of the brakes was made to control the speed immediately prior to the derailment. The engineer and the fireman were killed.

The surface, alignment and gage of the track on the curve are well maintained for the maximum authorized speed of 35 miles per hour. There were no wheel narks between the rails at the point of derailment. At the point of derailment there was a flange mark which extended across the head of the high rail a distance of 6-1/2 feet. This mark probably was made by the tender when it was pulled from the track by the engine. There were numerous flange marks eastward from the point of derailment, caused by the derailment of the cars.

The road foreman of engines said that it is customary to control the speed of passenger trains on the ascending grade in the territory involved by easing off on the throttle rather than by the use of the automatic brake system. It was his opinion that when No. 26 was approaching the curve involved the throttle was open to the extent that the train was moving at a speed somewhat in excess of the maximum authorized speed for the curve, that as the engine entered the curve the engineer suddenly moved the throttle to closed position and that, since the cars were provided with tightlock couplers and the journals of the equipment were provided with roller bearings, a sudden run-in of the slack occurred between the tender and the following cars, which resulted in an increase in the speed sufficient to cause the engine to overturn on the curve. The theoretical overturning speed at the point of derailment for engine 604 was 56 miles per hour. The engine was equipped with a speedometer but no speed recording device. It appears that the train was moving at overturning speed, as the engine overturned to the outside of the curve without marking the rails, and slid on its left side to the point where it stopped. However, a speed somewhat less than 56 miles per hour combined with a run-in of slack between the tender and the cars could have caused the engine to overturn.

 

CAUSE

 

It is found that this accident was caused by excessive speed on a curve. Dated at Washington, D. C., this thirty-first day of July, 1946. By the Commission, Commissioner Patterson.

W. P. BARTEL

Secretary

 

DizHarris@webtv.net

 

E. L. Harris

1718 Hamilton St.

Warren, OH 44485

 

Google Search: Using + , – , * and ? in genealogy searches

Here is a great tip from on of my favorite genealogy blogs! Maybe this will help you find that one elusive relative that you’ve been searching for!

Old Bones Genealogy of New England

OK, let’s continue the search for the mysterious John Smith. The previous hint initially found 228 million entries for the simple search for John Smith. That’s a few more than anyone would be prepared to search through page by page. The we pared that down using “John Smith” and further by using “John Smith ~genealogy.

So here’s the problem with “John Smith”. If John is out there on the internet with either a middle initial or a full middle name, this simple search for “John Smith” with question marks isn’t going to work to find them.

What do we do? The * and ? and other search tools are called “operators”. The * ~ and ? are all operators as well as + and -.

If John MIGHT have a middle name, here’s what you do: “John * Smith” ~genealogy. That search will return 208,000 responses, more that the 111,000…

View original post 410 more words

Who was Nannie?

I’ve been told by those in Russell County, VA…
 “if you meet a JESSEE – you’re probably related; if you meet a DAVIS – you’re probably not.

Genealogy is not for those who are gratified by the completed task because family historians are always in search of the next perfect piece to fit the puzzle. Little more than 30 years ago, after a lifetime of practically ignoring my family, I became interested in my ancestors. The journey began, as most genealogists suggest, by asking question of your parents. I discovered a good bit of first-hand information from Dad about his side of the family. Mom however, knew very little about her lineage probably because she was the eighth born in a family of ten children. Her DAVIS grandfather had passed away in 1899, long before her birth and her grandmother Nancy C. “Nannie” (Jessee) Davis passed away when her namesake, Nannie Lucille Davis, was only four. I have no pictures of Doctor Caleb Davis (1853-1899) and only the one of Nannie. (below on right)

As I began to ask questions of Mom’s sisters, my elderly aunts , I quickly learned that – like most families –  there was something to hide! Aunt Jo Ella (Davis) Mace told Mom it was not a good idea for me to start digging into our family history, “she might find a horse thief – or something.”

DAVIS Nancy C Jessee w dau Mary son Charles and wife KateWell, Aunt Jo was wrong about the horse thief, but she was right about diggin’ up a lil’ somethin’.  I discovered that my great-grandmother had 5 dear men in her life.

1) As a young girl still living at home and with her *widowed mother, Sarah Fuller Jessee (3/1833-1922) , Nannie become pregnant “out of wedlock”. She had her baby in 1871 at the age of 16. At first glance this seems to be such a shock for the days in which she lived from 1854-1925, however, the more I meet other researchers, I now know that this is not uncommon, even in those days.  We’re not too sure what happened to the young *basque, but Abner Smith (Smythe) left Russell County, VA and died in Blountville, TN.  Nannie reared her first born son, William Albert as a Jessee.

*Sanford Lea Jessee (10/23/1832-1/10/1862)
*from southern France – northern Spain region

2) On July 4, 1872, Nancy C. Jessee married Doctor Caleb Davis and less than three months later delivered their first son, Samuel A. Davis on September 26, 1872. This marriage was obvious stable for the young couple since they were parents to 12 children.

1. Samuel A. 9/26/1872
2. Jefferson Bonaparte 3/29/1874
3. Charles Henry “Keen” 7/7/1876 (WORKED ON THE N&W)
4. Mary A. 12/19/1877
5. Sarah Ellen 9/9/1878
 6. Manerva Josephine “Josie” 8/3/1881
7. David P 12/1879
8. Vance P.
 9. Asa C. “Acie” 1/7/1883 (SECTION FOREMAN ON THE N&W)
10. Ida E. 5/21/1885
11. Nannie K.
12. Polly M. abt 1886

My great-grandfather, Doctor Caleb Davis died in 1899.

3) Nannie married Joseph White on July 4, 1901. White died 3/9/1911.

4) Nannie married J.A. Elkins about 1912. Elkins died 4/13/1919.

5) Nannie married a Mr. Lowe about 1920. I have no records of Lowe, but Nannie died in Cedar Bluff, VA on February 16, 1925. I cannot find an obituary or record of her burial. Please contact me if you have either. sherrykelly@comcast.net

JOHNSON Jake & Mary Johnson (Asa Davis' sister)  DAVIS Asa  BLANKENSHIP Etta May, Gilmer, Aunt Ida Davis Blankenship (Asa's sister) WALLACE Morgan and M Josephine Davis

Above – Mary, Asa, Ida & Josie

JESSEE APrivateStanfordJessee29thVA JESSEE Sarah Sallie Fuller

Sanford Lea Jessee  and Sarah (Fuller) Jessee married in 1851 in Russell County VA.

Aunt Jo Ella (Davis) Mace 9/10/1911 – 8/25/1996

DAVIS Joella

BUCKLAND Lucille Davis  babysitting